Posts tagged ‘philosophy’

October 31st, 2014

10 Things That Annoy Philosophers

by Max Andrews

If you want to get under the skin of a philosopher there are a few ways to irk us. There’s more that just the annoyance of telling someone you’re a philosopher and they respond, “Oh, I took a psychology course in university!” Yes, that type of misunderstanding warrants the philosopher’s incredulous stare… just as these will:

10. “So, how will you make money? What do you do?”

Okay, so I’m not an engineer. I’m not a research chemist for a Fortune 500 corporation and I may not be able to work most blue collar tasks… However, I, and other philosophers, think (but there’s more!). For the philosopher, the act of philosophizing is not a mere intellectual exercise that could exist solely in consciousness. To the contrary, philosophy is a procedure and inquiry to the self, a “discovery and self-liberation.” The intellectual and cognitive acts of philosophy are participatory in their inquiry of the world. This would be very similar to the understanding that Socrates is the philosopher. He not only taught and philosophized, but he understood that the very act of philosophizing was an act of engagement with the world and it was a way of life.

9. The university administration putting philosophy in the periphery

Philosophy departments aren’t typically the big money-makers at university–typically. However, the university system needs to understand that the philosophy faculty, the philosophy students, and the discipline of philosophy in general is an investment rather than a moneymaker. I’ve seen firsthand that a university can divest in the philosophy department. Academia, the provost, the administrators, et al, need to view philosophy as the foundation by which a university is built and sustained.

October 6th, 2014

Google Hangout – “God and the Multiverse” Oct. 11

by Max Andrews

This week on Oct. 11 I will be doing a public talk via Google + Hangout with the Christian Apologists in Calgary, Canada. The topic of my talk will be on God and the multiverse. This promo video will outline what I’ll be speaking on. There will also be a Q&A afterwards.

No matter where you are in the world you can tune in and watch/listen to the lecture here.

https://plus.google.com/events/cu9arl5kbjsd7pb6s2g8fgqdblc

It starts 7pm MST, which is 2am my time. The talk, including the Q&A interaction, will last about an hour and a half.

October 2nd, 2014

Confessions of a Stranger – Now on Sale!

by Max Andrews

Screen Shot 2014-10-02 at 7.44.23 AMConfessions of a Stranger is a glimpse into the heart and mind of someone’s diary or journal. It will read like journal entries. For anyone who has ever kept a journal then it’ll be easy to understand that the narrator can be sporadic in thought just as each day meets us with blessings and curses. Some days will be overwhelmed with joy while others bring an affliction.

Link:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O2Y2CV0

While reading these journal entries sometimes you may feel lost or confused. If you do then you’re doing just fine. Keep reading. You’ll learn about the author’s life, his friends, and his family. He wants the good life. Aristotle taught that the purpose of life was to be happy. Happiness properly defined is fulfilling one’s purpose, telos, in life. As you’ll read, you’ll see that the author desperately desires happiness and if you were to be living with him during the writing of these entries you would probably never know how he really felt and what he really believed. This is a glimpse into the darkest depths of his heart and mind as he fights others and himself to obtain that happiness.

Though the entries and number of entries are not voluminous, you will read about the Stranger’s struggles of pain, suffering, social problems, familial problems, doubt, and, perhaps, most importantly, his struggle with God–in particular God’s love and existence.

Sometimes the scars that people have aren’t visible…

October 1st, 2014

Confessions of a Stranger Preview

by Max Andrews

Confessions of a Stranger is a glimpse into the heart and mind of someone’s diary or journal. It will read like journal entries. For anyone who has ever kept a journal then it’ll be easy to understand that the narrator can be sporadic in thought just as each day meets us with blessings and curses. Some days will be overwhelmed with joy while others bring an affliction.

While reading these journal entries sometimes you may feel lost or confused. If you do then you’re doing just fine. Keep reading. You’ll learn about the author’s life, his friends, and his family. He wants the good life. Aristotle taught that the purpose of life was to be happy. Happiness properly defined is fulfilling one’s purpose, telos, in life. As you’ll read, you’ll see that the author desperately desires happiness and if you were to be living with him during the writing of these entries you would probably never know how he really felt and what he really believed. This is a glimpse into the darkest depths of his heart and mind as he fights others and himself to obtain that happiness.

August 31st, 2014

The Likelihood Principle of Confirmation

by Max Andrews

Whenever we are considering two competing hypotheses, an observation counts as evidence in favor of the hypothesis under which the observation has the highest probability.

The Likelihood Principle of Confirmation theory states as follows.  Let h1 and h2 be two be competing hypothesis (in this case the existence of X and ~X, with X being a first cause, fine-tuner, a particle, etc.).  According to the Likelihood Principle, an observation e counts as evidence in favor of hypothesis h1 over h2 if the observation is more probable under h1 than h2.  Thus, e counts in favor of h1 over h2 if P(e|h1) > P(e|h2), where P(e|h1) and P(e|h2) depict a conditional probability of e on h1 and h2, respectively.  The degree to which the evidence counts in favor of one hypothesis over another is proportional to the degree to which e is more probable under h1 than h2: particularly, it is proportional to P(e|h1)/P(e|h2) .  The Likelihood Principle seems to be sound under all interpretations of probability.  This form is concerned with epistemic probability.

August 14th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep11: Top Ten Movies from a Philosophical Perspective (or Not)

by Max Andrews

Ben HurIn this episode I’m joined by Tyler McNabb as we share our top ten favourite movies. I asked some listeners for random podcast ideas and this one came up so please feel free to send me your ideas and I can give you a shout out for doing so.

sententias.org
@maxeoa

tylerdaltonmcnabb.com
@tylerdmcnabb

August 14th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep10: Science and Pseudoscience

by Max Andrews

In this episode I discuss criteria for making the demarcation between science and pseudoscience–that is, what we should consider science and non-science. I use an example of “Creation Science” as an example and evaluate whether or not it is scientific.

sententias.org
@maxeoa

Full Text: sententias.org/2012/02/21/scienc…nd-pseudoscience/

Max Andrews Eavesdropping Podcast Science and Pseudoscience Philosophy

August 13th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep9: Max Baker-Hytch on Culture and Religious Belief

by Max Andrews

I recently presented at the Tyndale Fellowship Conference in Cambridge in July. Whilst in attendance I listened to a paper by Max Baker-Hytch on this issue of cultural contingency of religion (or God being a “cultural chauvinist”) from a Reformed Epistemologist perspective. The paper is titled “Religious diversity and epistemic luck” by Max Baker-Hytch (PhD Philosophy, Oxford) and was published in the International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.

This episode of Eavesdropping is the audio recording from his presentation in Cambridge.

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August 12th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep8: Beginner Philosophers

by Max Andrews

Window WritingIn this episode (Eavesdropping Ep8: Beginner Philosophers) I briefly discuss a few points of advice I have for those who are beginning their personal and/or academic studies in philosophy.

Eavesdropping is conversational, informal podcast that is sometimes a monologue, or dialogue with guests, on various topics including philosophy, theology, science, contemporary events, and random meanderings of a philosopher. The primary focuses are philosophy of science, multiverse scenarios, and Molinism.

Please consider donating via my PayPal (also the yellow donate button on the right column) to help me continue my research and online presence. I’m always very grateful. Thank you.

August 11th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep6: Advice to Serious Students

by Max Andrews

I figured it was about time for me to distribute some unsolicited advice (though some have asked for it so there is some wanted solicitation). In Eavesdropping Ep 6 I offer ten points of advice and wisdom that I’ve implemented and learned by using in my own academic career. This podcast is suited for two primary audiences: the students themselves and the family or parents of the students. For the family, brothers, sisters, girlfriends, boyfriends, wives, husbands, etc. that are supporters of their student then hopefully this podcast will help you help them stay on track.

I haven’t always been successful in my academic career so I may not be an authority here. However, that’s not to say that I haven’t done well either. I wanted to share my scholastic habits with those university students who want to take their education seriously. I cannot offer guarantees but it’s my hope that you do what works for you and practice the habits that will produce a successful academic career.

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