Posts tagged ‘Paul Copan’

August 15th, 2012

A Round Table Discussion with Michael Licona on the Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach

by Max Andrews

In the most recent issue of the Southeastern Theological Review Danny Akin, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Michael Kruger, Michael Licona, and Charles Quarles had a published discussion on Michael Licona’s Historiographical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus. The article surveys the real issues at hand and presents a refreshing dialogue of the scholarly issues Licona tackles in his most recent book. If you don’t have the book it’s a must for your personal library. If you don’t have it consider yourself uneducated (too harsh?).  You’ll also notice yours truly cited by Paul Copan in footnote 9 on page 79.

Here’s the appropriate citation and link to view the article:

Danny Akin, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Michael Kruger, Michael Licona, and Charles Quarles, “A Round Table Discussion with Michael Licona on the Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach.” Southeastern Theological Review 3 no. 1 (Summer 2012): 71-98.

January 17th, 2012

William Lane Craig’s “J. Howard Sobel on the Kalam Cosmological Argument”–A Review

by Max Andrews

A Review of William Lane Craig’s “J. Howard Sobel on the Kalam Cosmological Argument.” Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2006): 565-584.

William Lane Craig formulates retort to J. Howard Sobel’s objection to kalam as he typically formulates it.[1] Premise 1 seems obviously true—at least, more than its negation.  To suggest that things could just pop into being uncaused out of nothing is to quit doing serious metaphysics and is a premise that Sobel acknowledges to be true.  Sobel’s objection is with 2—that the universe began to exist.  This would then run into an infinite regress, which is philosophically and mathematically untenable.  Because an actually infinite number of things cannot exist, the series of past events must be finite in number and, hence, the temporal series of past, physical events is not without beginning.[2]

November 21st, 2011

“When The Saints Go Marching In”–Mike Licona’s ETS Paper

by Max Andrews

Last week Mike Licona presented his paper, “When The Saints Go Marching In (Matthew 27.52-52): Historicity, Apocalyptic Symbol, and Inerrancy,” to fellow scholars of the Evangelical Theological Society, which included William Lane Craig, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Dan Wallace, and Darrell Bock in the audience.

You may view the paper at Licona’s website.

You may listen to the presentation MP3 at Licona’s website.

I appreciate Licona responding to Geisler in the academic arena.  I hope many scholars take this issue and carry the research to verify or falsify this interpretation of Matthew’s raised saints to the best historiography can offer. (Also, you’ll note that Licona takes the modest position of agnosticism at the moment.)  I certainly hope that Matthew 27 doesn’t become the litmus test for society membership or that it sneaks its way into some statement of faith (anymore than it already is).

My only hope is that Geisler either responds in the academic arena haven been given the chance to read Licona’s footnotes or that he drop this whole sideshow and move on.