Posts tagged ‘Molinism’

July 12th, 2014

Interview: Molinism – A Glimpse into the Mind of God?

by Max Andrews

I recently had a great interview with Julian Charles at The Mind Renewed on questions concerning Molinism. Please listen to the interview and subscribe to his podcast. See the tags at the bottom of the page for all the topics that came up and were mentioned during the interview.

TMR 076 : Max Andrews : Molinism – A Glimpse into the Mind of God?

If God knows the future, how can I be free? If there’s human evil in the world, how can God be good? If people live beyond the reach of the Gospel, how can God be all-loving?

This week we are joined by the philosopher Max Andrews for a fascinating look at the mind-bending and strange (yet potentially illuminating) world of Molinism, a philosophical position on God’s omniscience and providence that offers potential solutions to a whole host of theological conundrums.

The interview was two hours but we had to cut out some material so if you are looking for more information to fill in any gaps or if you have any questions please check out my ebook:

An Introduction to Molinism: Scripture, Reason, and All that God has Ordered

June 7th, 2014

Purchase “An Introduction to Molinism” Available Now!

by Max Andrews

Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 10.31.48 PM

My new ebook is now available for a purchase of $4.99 (or currently £3.07)!

An Introduction to Molinism (UK)

An Introduction to Molinism (US)

Here’s the promotional benefit for you if you buy. It’s three easy steps:

  1. Buy the book
  2. Promote the book on social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.). Even if you didn’t like the book this step is still required. (Just screenshot your posts and tweets and send them to me.)
  3. Write a review on Amazon and be honest. If it’s rubbish then say so (I hope not, but if so, be kind!). If it’s good then say it’s good.

If you do all these steps and send me the screenshots of your social media promotions (email them to mlandrews@sententias.org) and then you’ll be entered into a drawing for three winners, each will receive a $10 Amazon Gift Card. So, you have the potential to get your money back and more! This time, instead of just one winner there will be three (“May the odds be ever in your favor!”).

This ebook is designed to introduce Molinism and middle knowledge to those who are interested in it. This isn’t a tome intended to have answers to everything. Here are the contents:

Preface: What You’re Getting Yourself Into…

Ch. 1: Beware: Philosophy!
Ch. 2: Middle Knowledge in a Nutshell
Ch. 3: Depravity and Libertarian Freedom
Ch. 4: Foreknowledge
Ch. 5: Hasker’s Theological Fatalism
Ch. 6: Providence by Knowledge
Ch. 7: The Dual Personal Experience
Ch. 8: Counterfactuals
Ch. 9: “They Would Have Believed…”
Ch. 10: Shards and the Potter
Ch. 11: Molinism in the Modern Discussion

June 3rd, 2014

New Book: An Introduction to Molinism

by Max Andrews


Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 10.31.48 PMUPDATE: The book has been delayed for a few reasons but it should be out by Saturday or Sunday.

This Friday, 6 June 2014 I’ll be publishing my new book An Introduction to Molinism: Scripture, Reason, and All that God has Ordered. This ebook is designed to introduce Molinism and middle knowledge to those who are interested in it. This isn’t a tome intended to have answers to everything.

I attempt to render the coherence of middle knowledge. Molinism is the application of the doctrine of middle knowledge so soteriology, providence, etc. are peripheral in my discussion. This introduction primarily concerns middle knowledge and looks at perfect being theology, human depravity, human freedom, and divine freedom. All of this takes place in the discipline of philosophical theology, formulating concepts of God (miracles, prayer, etc.) based in revelation. Middle knowledge is derived from theological and rational reflection. In the book I argue for the legitimacy of philosophy and science and their proper place in hermeneutics and exegesis.

May 19th, 2014

The Spread of Molinism

by Max Andrews
I’ve been off of Facebook for a while [for several reasons] and apparently there is now a Molinist group. I don’t know how many people are in it but it’s nice for like-minded individuals to share and exchange ideas with one another (likewise, of course, interacting with opposing views).

I recently spent an afternoon with Tyler McNabb[1] in Glasgow. Later that day Tyler sent me an email of encouragement. Part of it was below. Apparently, someone asked, “Just out of curiosity, how many here were introduced to Molinism by WLC?” Below are a few responses.

Dwight Stanislaw WLC and Max Andrews. Max led me to Keathley’s book, which was the first treatment on Molinism I’ve read. Now I’m reading Freddoso’s intro to Molina’s own work and it’s destroying every last brain cell I have left.

Chad Miller Dwight literally took the exact route I did. I was intrigued by WLC but still Calvinist. I got to know Max via social media and communicated a lot with him. I asked him THE book on Molinism that gave the best argument and he recommend S&S by Ken Keathley, and now I’m here in this group and shall remain as long as Facebook is around…

Jonathan Thompson WLC, Plantinga, and Max Andrews. I first came in contact with this view upon hearing WLC’s lecture “Is One True Religion Possible?”.

March 14th, 2014

Upcoming Paper on Divine Sovereignty and Omnipotence

by Max Andrews

Several months ago I was approached by an editor for a journal (Testamentum Imperium) requesting that I submit a paper. The theme of the issue is   “Divine Sovereignty in Reformed Theology.” They are backlogged with some people having withdrawn before submission. I suspect I’ll be the token Molinist. Naturally, I’ll be offering a defense of a Molinist model of divine sovereignty. Below is the abstract for my paper titled, “The Sovereignty of God and Omnipotence”.

Abstract: The means by which God conducts his sovereign rein over creation has varied amongst theologians and philosophers of religion for centuries. I will argue that omnipotence is a modal function and is a bilateral means in conjunction with omniscience by which God sovereignly controls creation. Without having these two attributes (as well as goodness, love, etc.) functioning together then there are deleterious theological consequences for the actualization of states of affairs.

March 3rd, 2014

The Problem of Bad “Biblical” Rhetoric

by Max Andrews

If we are pursuing truth then there are many means to discovering what the truth is [about God, reality, etc.]. It’s incredibly naïve to dismiss something because it is not in a preferred category. If we are pursing truth then it would be a category error to dismiss a challenging viewpoint simply because of categorically dismissiveness. Throwing words around like unbiblical, sub-biblical, and non-biblcal are rhetorical devices used in a debate when both parties (or more) believe that they are defending a biblical position. You may believe that something is one of the aforementioned categories but to continuously bring it up is quite the rhetorical effort, and I admit, probably effective to the listeners and debaters, but it doesn’t help and it’s simply annoying. The same thing goes for the claim of “meaningful exegesis” (some people may recognize that line). The two parties in the debate sincerely believe they are doing meaningful exegesis but it simply rhetoric and places the person categorically below the other one by trumpeting their position as being [the only] biblical position. It’s like political public opinion. If you repeat something long enough, be it true or not true, they’re going to start believing it (analogically speaking, the audience or listeners).

February 12th, 2014

Boethius, Foreknowledge, and Human Freedom

by Max Andrews

Boethius discusses the problem in reconciling genuine human freedom with God’s foreknowledge in “Divine Foreknowledge and Freedom of the Will” (proses III-VI).  He bases his whole discussion on whether or not something that is foreknown happens by necessity.  He offers the disjunctive option of the necessity of either thing, which are going to happen be foreseen by God or that what God foresees will in fact happen—either way, he argues, human will is removed.  When discussing the uncertainty of future events he concludes that, for God, there must be no uncertainty in these events because it’s then reduced to possible conditionals, or could-counterfactuals.  Hence, the law of excluded middle is true for knowledge of future tensed events.  He makes an interesting point when discussing aspects about Cicero’s contribution to the problem.  If foreknowledge is removed then the events of human will are no longer necessary. Considering all of the discussion so far he believes that everything that happens does so by necessity.

February 6th, 2014

Encouraging Email from a Reader

by Max Andrews

writing a letterDear Mr. Andrews,

I want to thank you for inspiring my son, Elijah.  Elijah is 14-years-old and an avid reader of your blog and of all things philosophical and theological.  He is a true believer in Jesus who is endlessly reading and learning in order to strengthen and understand his faith.  He seeks out debates to watch online, and is most recently consumed with a book on Molinism.  One of his great thrills was meeting Dr. Robert George of the Witherspoon Institute when he spoke last semester at Clemson University on the topic, ‘Was Jesus a Socialist?’  Of course, today he was also thrilled that you responded to a comment of his on your blog.

Elijah is that rare creature of the mind whose interests are wide-ranging, from ancient history to physics.  He is an excellent mathematician who recently finished his first college math class.

I want to encourage you, as a father and fellow believer, to continue to inspire your readers and students whenever that opportunity should arise again in the future.  We little know the effect of the ripples we send out, but yours have touched the life of a young man who may yet be a scholar (or who knows what).  Certainly, a young man who might be your graduate student someday!

November 7th, 2013

Truth Will Rise to the Top Through a Free and Open Exchange in the Marketplace of Ideas

by Max Andrews

The English poet John Milton did well when he said that “Truth will rise to the top through a free and open exchange in the marketplace of ideas.”  I am so encouraged when I have and see a substantive dialogue with someone concerning an issue.  This is certainly important in every day discussions, blogs, and teaching.  I assist in managing and teaching an Intro. to Philosophy course at university and I always encourage my students to make us work hard to convince them of what we believe to be true.  Do not simply sit there and take what I say and teach prima facie–challenge me, challenge the thoughts, challenge your thinking.

October 28th, 2013

Top Ten Podcasts for the Christian Thinker

by Max Andrews

The following are a list of podcasts that I’ve been following and listening to that have been quite helpful in my philosophical, scientific, and theological studies.  The criteria for consideration are based on 1) quality of content, 2) accurate presentation of the material, 3) constructive and respectful criticism of opposing views, 4) frequency of podcast release, and 5) a broad range of topics/issues discussed.

Screen Shot 2013-10-28 at 12.24.53 PM#1. Unbelievable? – Hosted by Justin Brierly with Premier Christian Radio.  Unbelievable? is a UK-based public radio program, which airs every Saturday afternoon with an occasional podcast posting mid-week.  Justin brings in several leading scholars in theological and philosophical matters and they debate and dialogue particular issues ranging from ethics, comparative religions, the existence of God, science, doctrinal differences, and current events.