Posts tagged ‘german’

April 25th, 2013

Heilsgeschichte

by Max Andrews

Heilsgeschichte (hiyels-ge-sheek-te), when translated from German it literally means “salvation history.”

Heilsgeschichte is an organizing principle developed by Oscar Cullman for the various New Testament titles for Jesus. Cullman’s Christology is centered on what Jesus has done in history.

It is a characteristic of New Testament Christology that Christ is connected with the total history of revelation and salvation, beginning with creation. There can be no Heilsgeschichte without Christology; no Christology without aHeilsgeschichte which unfolds in time. Christology is the doctrine of an event, not the doctrine of natures. (Oscar Cullman, The Christology of the New Testament, rev. ed. [Philadelphia: Westminster, 1963], 9).

April 11th, 2012

Word of the Week Wednesday: Ding an Sich

by Max Andrews

The Word of the Week is: Ding an Sich

Definition:  German–sometimes appearing as Dinge an Sich, which means ‘the thing itself.’

More about the term:  When drawing out the distinction between ‘subjective’ and ‘objective’ Ding an Sich refers to the thing objectively to itself.  For instance, in Kantian terms,space and time was debated as to whether it was a necessary intuition (one of Kant’s twelve categories of the mind) belonging subjectively to appearances (Ersheinungen) or objectively to the thing itself (Ding an Sich).  Kant believed that such spatiotemporal properties belong to Ersheinungen buy excluded such properties to the things as they really are, Ding an Sich.

January 18th, 2012

Word of the Week Wednesday: Heilsgeschichte

by Max Andrews

The Word of the Week is: Heilsgeschichte (hiyels-ge-sheek-te)

Definition: When translated from German it literally means “salvation history.”

More about the term: Heilsgeschichte is an organizing principle developed by Oscar Cullman for the various New Testament titles for Jesus. Cullman’s Christology is centered on what Jesus has done in history.

It is a characteristic of New Testament Christology that Christ is connected with the total history of revelation and salvation, beginning with creation. There can be no Heilsgeschichte without Christology; no Christology without a Heilsgeschichte which unfolds in time. Christology is the doctrine of an event, not the doctrine of natures. (Oscar Cullman, The Christology of the New Testament, rev. ed. [Philadelphia: Westminster, 1963], 9).