Posts tagged ‘education’

August 14th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep10: Science and Pseudoscience

by Max Andrews

In this episode I discuss criteria for making the demarcation between science and pseudoscience–that is, what we should consider science and non-science. I use an example of “Creation Science” as an example and evaluate whether or not it is scientific.

sententias.org
@maxeoa

Full Text: sententias.org/2012/02/21/scienc…nd-pseudoscience/

Max Andrews Eavesdropping Podcast Science and Pseudoscience Philosophy

August 13th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep9: Max Baker-Hytch on Culture and Religious Belief

by Max Andrews

I recently presented at the Tyndale Fellowship Conference in Cambridge in July. Whilst in attendance I listened to a paper by Max Baker-Hytch on this issue of cultural contingency of religion (or God being a “cultural chauvinist”) from a Reformed Epistemologist perspective. The paper is titled “Religious diversity and epistemic luck” by Max Baker-Hytch (PhD Philosophy, Oxford) and was published in the International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.

This episode of Eavesdropping is the audio recording from his presentation in Cambridge.

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August 12th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep8: Beginner Philosophers

by Max Andrews

Window WritingIn this episode (Eavesdropping Ep8: Beginner Philosophers) I briefly discuss a few points of advice I have for those who are beginning their personal and/or academic studies in philosophy.

Eavesdropping is conversational, informal podcast that is sometimes a monologue, or dialogue with guests, on various topics including philosophy, theology, science, contemporary events, and random meanderings of a philosopher. The primary focuses are philosophy of science, multiverse scenarios, and Molinism.

Please consider donating via my PayPal (also the yellow donate button on the right column) to help me continue my research and online presence. I’m always very grateful. Thank you.

August 11th, 2014

Eavesdropping Ep6: Advice to Serious Students

by Max Andrews

I figured it was about time for me to distribute some unsolicited advice (though some have asked for it so there is some wanted solicitation). In Eavesdropping Ep 6 I offer ten points of advice and wisdom that I’ve implemented and learned by using in my own academic career. This podcast is suited for two primary audiences: the students themselves and the family or parents of the students. For the family, brothers, sisters, girlfriends, boyfriends, wives, husbands, etc. that are supporters of their student then hopefully this podcast will help you help them stay on track.

I haven’t always been successful in my academic career so I may not be an authority here. However, that’s not to say that I haven’t done well either. I wanted to share my scholastic habits with those university students who want to take their education seriously. I cannot offer guarantees but it’s my hope that you do what works for you and practice the habits that will produce a successful academic career.

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August 23rd, 2013

Unsolicited Advice to Serious University Students

by Max Andrews

I figured it was about time for me to distribute some unsolicited advice. I haven’t always been successful in my academic career so I may not be an authority here. However, that’s not to say that I haven’t done well either. I wanted to share my scholastic habits with those university students who want to take their education seriously. I cannot offer guarantees but it’s my hope that you do what works for you and practice the habits that will produce a successful academic career.

  1. Education is a joy. The greatest trick the schools have ever pulled on us is to make us think education is purely pragmatic. Education is merely to accomplish an end for financial gain or the requirements to get into a good sports team, etc. Those who have bought into this idea have fallen prey to anti-intellectualism.
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June 24th, 2013

The Greatest Trick the Schools Have Ever Pulled On Us

by Max Andrews

The greatest trick the schools have ever pulled on us is to make us think education is purely pragmatic. Education is merely to accomplish an end for financial gain or the requirements to get into a good sports team, etc. Those who have bought into this idea have fallen prey to anti-intellectualism.

The greatest joy of education is that it never ends.  There is an enlightening splendor in the discovery of knowledge.  A yearn that is never quenched.  When we think we are satisfied and we’ve learned enough we’ve only demonstrated our finitude.  The virtue of knowledge is completely underappreciated.  

March 8th, 2013

Old Earth, Young Minds: Evangelical Homeschoolers Embrace Evolution

by Max Andrews

Reblogged from The Atlantic.

More Christian parents are asking for mainstream science in their children’s curricula. Will religious textbook companies deliver?

For homeschooling parents who want to teach their children that the earth is only a few thousand years old, the theory of evolution is a lie, and dinosaurs coexisted with humans, there is no shortage of materials. Kids can start with the Answers in Genesis curriculum, which features books such as Dinosaurs of Eden, written by Creation Museum founder Ken Ham. As the publisher’s description states, “This exciting book for the entire family uses the Bible as a ‘time machine’ to journey through the events of the past and future.”

It’s no secret that the majority of homeschooled children in America belong to evangelical Christian families. What’s less known is that a growing number of their parents are dismayed by these textbooks.

Take Erinn Cameron Warton, an evangelical Christian who homeschools her children. Warton, a scientist, says she was horrified when she opened a homeschool science textbook and found a picture of Adam and Eve putting a saddle on a dinosaur. “I nearly choked,” says the mother of three. “When researching homeschooling curricula, I found that the majority of Christian homeschool textbooks are written from this ridiculous perspective. Once I saw this, I vowed never to use them.” Instead, Warton has pulled together a curriculum inspired partly by homeschool pioneer Susan Wise Bauer and partly by the Waldorf holistic educational movement.

Continue reading the original story from The Atlantic

October 18th, 2012

Research Funding

by Max Andrews

I am currently completing my MA in Philosophy and have been accepted to the University of Edinburgh’s PhD in Philosophy program. I’ve also applied to Oxford and Cambridge but won’t find out if I’ve been accepted for quite a while. My research is in the fine-tuning of nomic behavior in multiverse scenarios.

My wife and I will need to move to Edinburgh, Scotland next summer (2013). We are graciously seeking funds and donation from anyone who believes in the potential impact my research will have for philosophy, science, and theology. We have faced several trials with my Crohn’s disease, which hasn’t put us in a financial advantage for this endeavor. We need about $18,000 for the student visa application process and additional funding for tuition, travel, and setting up a new home. We’ll eventually need much more than what we are requesting here but we are hoping to work hard and earn as much money as we can to make it.

I would love to speak with anyone interested in helping us fund my PhD and contribute to academia. If you or anyone else know of anyone willing to help or even other programs or organizations that would be interested please let me know. There’s so much more I would love to discuss so please contact me at mlandrews@sententias.org. You can view my CV and present research at http://sententias.org/cv/. Thank you for your consideration. Anything would be a tremendous blessing.
May 9th, 2012

The Joy of Education

by Max Andrews

The greatest joy of education is that it never ends.  There is an enlightening splendor in the discovery of knowledge.  A yearn that is never quenched.  When we think we are satisfied and we’ve learned enough we’ve only demonstrated our finitude.  The virtue of knowledge is completely underappreciated.  The youth go to university to earn a degree for success or a high paying job without understanding that what they have attained is priceless.  The virtue of knowledge and the joy of discovery is widely ignored and set in the periphery.  Why is knowledge not delighted in for its own sake?

April 4th, 2012

So, You Need an Education to Understand the Bible? How Dare You Say Such a Thing

by Max Andrews

I recently shared a previous post of mine in which I discuss my response to the atheist objection that God is a moral monster on Facebook.  Referring to my comment that understanding the Levitical law requires an advanced knowledge of hermeneutics an agnostic/atheist responded:

Are you saying that a person can’t judge morality without some fancy education?

No, this is not what I’m saying at all.  My point is that you don’t learn the hermeneutical approach to understanding the laws and commands in the Old Testament in a first year hermeneutics class.  However, if one wants to have a deep knowledge of the material one does need an education on it.  This doesn’t mean you have to get a degree in it but you do need to be well read on hermeneutics.  Somehow Christians and non-Christians have a stigma suggesting that it’s offensive if a certain degree of knowledge is required to understand something.  How is this offensive? Surely, the Bible can be understood without a degree in theology or biblical studies but to understand it with depth you will have to read and learn.  We do we demand such simplicity?  If a cosmologist says that I need an advanced knowledge of relativity theory and quantum theory to understand the early models of our universe should I be offended? No. There are certain antecedent conditions that must be met in order to really understand something with meaningful depth.  It’s the process of learning and getting an education.