Posts tagged ‘cs lewis’

November 7th, 2013

CS Lewis’ Idea of Heaven

by Max Andrews

Pleasures are to last forever in some form or another.  According to Lewis, a pleasure is full grown only when it is remembered.[1] This full knowledge and complete fruition of pleasure will only be in the fulfillment of one’s telos.  This lapse in knowledge, the separation between the subject and object (the epistemic gap between the subject and the object of desire that full one’s pleasures) is removed in heaven.  In Narnia, The Last Battle is the battle of the real forms—a draw to a close between this epistemic gap.  Digory, looking at the new Narnia, seeing that it is a fuller, more real version of the old Narnia, comments that, “It’s all in Plato, all in Plato.”[2]  Lewis’ Platonism is one in which ideas becomes concrete forms.  In heaven, Lewis says, is where heaven is a place where subject and object come together: thought and form become one when subject experiences object.[3] 

July 31st, 2013

Purgatory: Do Our Souls Demand it?

by Max Andrews

The following is a guest post by Shaun M. Smith. Shaun is a Masters level student of philosophy and a Graduate Assistant serving as an online philosophy instructor for Liberty University. I do not agree with Shaun’s position and this is not an endorsement of his views.

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There is no doubt to me, or perhaps to any Protestant Christian, the term “purgatory” is followed with such nail biting disgust.  Seemingly so, almost every Protestant dismisses the doctrine without even coming close to understanding the essential nature and properties of the doctrine of purgatory.  Due to the Catholic Church’s overly corrupted use of such a doctrine, most in western theology have grown bitter towards the doctrine of purgatory, as Martin Luther once did (perhaps, rightly so!). 

November 20th, 2012

The Magician’s Twin: CS Lewis on Scientism

by Max Andrews

October 18th, 2012

The Epistemology Directory

by Max Andrews
Below is a collection of all my blog posts specifically related to epistemology.
  1. My Evidentialist Epistemology
  2. Onto-Relationships and Epistemology
  3. Why Plantinga’s Warrant Cannot Circumvent the Gettier Problem
  4. A General Rule for Gettier Cases
  5. Empiricism and Being in the Right Phenomenological Frame of Mind
  6. Meet Philosopher Linda Zagzebski
  7. The Connection Between Phenomenology and Existentialism
  8. A Response to Alvin Plantinga’s “The Reformed Objection to Natural Theology”
  9. Alex Rosenberg on Whether Philosophy Emerges from Science
  10. Steven Wykstra’s “Toward a Sensible Evidentialism: ‘On the Notion of Needing Evidence.’”
  11. Immanuel Kant’s Categorical Epistemology
  12. New Paper: “Epistemological Scientific Realism and the Onto-Relationship of Inferentially Justified and Non-Inferentially Justified Beliefs”
    read more »

August 4th, 2012

The Social Darwinian Revolution

by Max Andrews

Evolutionary Theories of Marriage and Mating

“All those who have most closely studied the subject, and whose judgment is worth much more than mine, believe that communal marriage was the original and universal form throughout the world, including the intermarriage of brothers and sisters.”  Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, Book II, pp. 358-358

The Kinsey Revolution (Alfred Kinsey)

  • Grew up in South Orange, NJ
  • Classmates predicted as “second Darwin”
  • Earned doctorate from Harvard, majoring in animal and plant taxonomy
  • Early work on gall wasps, but switched focus to human sexuality in 1930’s
  • By 1940’s received funding from the National Academy of Sciences and Rockefeller Foundation for study of human sexuality
  • Sexual Behavior in the Human Male released in 1948.
  • Reduced sexuality in the “human animal” to the product of normal mammalian biology
  • Claimed his research was neutral and value-free, but his comments undercut this claim
  • Kinsey’s unorthodox personal life
  • Pressured associates to engage in mutual sex
  • Engaged in masochistic sexual activities
  • Pressured students to submit to invasive interviews
  • Hated religion
    read more »

May 22nd, 2012

CS Lewis and Heaven

by Max Andrews

Pleasures are to last forever in some form or another.  According to Lewis, a pleasure is full grown only when it is remembered.[1]  This full knowledge and complete fruition of pleasure will only be in the fulfillment of one’s telos.  This lapse in knowledge, the separation between the subject and object (the epistemic gap between the subject and the object of desire that full one’s pleasures) is removed in heaven.  In Narnia, The Last Battle is the battle of the real forms—a draw to a close between this epistemic gap.  Digory, looking at the new Narnia, seeing that it is a fuller, more real version of the old Narnia, comments that, “It’s all in Plato, all in Plato.”[2]  Lewis’ Platonism is one in which ideas becomes concrete forms.  In heaven, Lewis says, is where heaven is a place where subject and object come together: thought and form become one when subject experiences object.[3]  Thus, the object one predicates pleasure to is in full knowledge and the ignorance–the lapse–is removed.

May 19th, 2012

CS Lewis’ Sehnsucht and the Epistemic Split

by Max Andrews

Lewis’ argument from desire posits a certain degree of ignorance as to how the object of desire fulfills that Sehnsucht (literally meaning mind-search, a deep and mysterious longing for something, usually lasting).

 

  1. Every natural, innate desire corresponds to some real object that can satisfy that desire.
  2. But there exists a desire space, time, or anything can satisfy. This desire is not the difference of degree of natural desire but a different kind.
  3. Therefore, There must exist something more than these natural [natural], which can satisfy this desire.

He ascribes certain subjective pleasures to an object, which rests at an epistemic distance.  There is a concrete/abstract dilemma, which keeps us from knowing a thing completely.  We can know about it; we can experience it.  Both cannot be done simultaneously and each has its limits when isolated.  This epistemic problem, or the lapse in knowledge in illicit pleasure, is due to a separation of the subject from the object[1].  Lewis roots the epistemic dilemmas, the loss of concrete thought, in a long process of separation that begins in the fall. 

April 23rd, 2012

CS Lewis’ ‘The Screwtape Letters’ Audio

by Max Andrews

I originally found this video shared on Justin Taylor’s blog at The Gospel Coalition.  This video has John Cleese reading the book, which is very Germane and is, oh, classical?

Then there is, which absolutely recommend, Screwtape.  This was a project overseen by Douglas Gresham, Lewis’ step-son, whom I have had the privilege of meeting.  This version of the letters is more Rock and Roll, heavy, and real.  Please watch the first video posted on their site (you’ll also see Gresham in his Tazmanian naval sweater, which I envy).

I just finished a paper on Lewis’ eudaimonistic ethic and worked quite a bit in Screwtape.  Enjoy.

(EDIT 12.37 April 23, 2012: VIDEO REMOVED FROM YOUTUBE)