Archive for August 15th, 2012

August 15th, 2012

The Scaffolding of Despair and the Paradox of Suicide

by Max Andrews

If God does not exist then man lives in Bertrand Russell’s world of scaffolding despair.  Man is merely the product of pointless cause and effects with no prevision of the ends being achieved.  All the labors of the age, devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius, are destined to extinction in the vase death of the solar system.  Man’s achievements are destined to be buried in the debris of the universe.  Only within the scaffolding of these [teleological] truths, only on the firm foundation of unyielding despair, can the soul’s habitation henceforth be safely built.[1]

August 15th, 2012

A Round Table Discussion with Michael Licona on the Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach

by Max Andrews

In the most recent issue of the Southeastern Theological Review Danny Akin, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Michael Kruger, Michael Licona, and Charles Quarles had a published discussion on Michael Licona’s Historiographical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus. The article surveys the real issues at hand and presents a refreshing dialogue of the scholarly issues Licona tackles in his most recent book. If you don’t have the book it’s a must for your personal library. If you don’t have it consider yourself uneducated (too harsh?).  You’ll also notice yours truly cited by Paul Copan in footnote 9 on page 79.

Here’s the appropriate citation and link to view the article:

Danny Akin, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Michael Kruger, Michael Licona, and Charles Quarles, “A Round Table Discussion with Michael Licona on the Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach.” Southeastern Theological Review 3 no. 1 (Summer 2012): 71-98.

August 15th, 2012

Word of the Week Wednesday: Flavor (Particle Physics)

by Max Andrews

Word of the Week: Flavor (particle physics)

Definition: The property that makes the distinction between one quark and anthers. Quarks come in six flavors: up, down, strange, charm, top, and bottom.

More about the term: The term is sometimes extended to describe different flavors of a lepton; in that case, the varieties are electron, electron neutrino, muon, muon neutrino, tau, and tau neutrino. For more about the term and related information please see John Gribbin’s Q is for Quantum (London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1998), 141.