Archive for May 24th, 2012

May 24th, 2012

Theology Thursday: Immanuel Kant Part 1

by Max Andrews

Theologian: Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) on Noumenal Knowledge

More about his theology:  Kant is known more for his philosophy but has greatly influenced 19th and 20th century theology.  He is known as the watershed of 20th century theology.  You may not realize it but that vast majority of our epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and theology have been influenced by Kant.  This Theology Thursday will focus on Kant’s noumenal knowledge.

Immanuel Kant proposed the practical or moral realm of life as the proper sphere of religion. Kant sought to establish religion as the devotion to a transcendent Lawgiver whose will ought to be the goal of humankind. The theology produced by Kant remained anthropocentric (centered on man) and it leads to an inescapable emphasis on divine immanence even though Kant himself rejected it.

May 24th, 2012

Stephen Meyer’s 2011 Lecture on Signature in the Cell

by Max Andrews

This lecture was delivered by Dr Stephen Meyer, Discovery Institute, Seattle and hosted by Lord McKay of Clashfern. The theme of the lecture is Dr Meyer’s recent book, ‘Signature in the Cell’ (HarperOne, 2009). The lecture gives a clear exposition of the problem of the origin of life and how the existence of biological information provides compelling scientific evidence for intelligent design (ID). The content of the lecture also demonstrates, incidentally, that the dismissal of ID as religion is shallow and uninformed.

May 24th, 2012

If Humans Write Genetic Code, Is It Intelligent Design?

by Max Andrews

Reblogged from Evolution News and Views.

Scientists are starting to use DNA to write computer code. They fancy themselves as designers of a system. What does this imply about the natural genetic code?

It’s “totally rad,” announced a press release from Stanford School of Medicine: “Scientists from Stanford’s Department of Bioengineering have devised a method for repeatedly encoding, storing and erasing digital data within the DNA of living cells.” After 3 years of work and 750 tries, they found a way to create and erase digital code using DNA molecules.

They’re not using the A-G-C-T bases that the natural genetic code uses to store information. Instead, they use the way a portion of DNA points as the equivalent of a bit: one way indicates a one, the other indicates a zero. It’s rad because they named it that: Recombinase Addressable Data (RAD). It offers the power to use DNA as non-volatile memory and a molecular “switch” to turn on fluorescent proteins in microbes.