Archive for May 17th, 2012

May 17th, 2012

The 8 Eastern Philosophers Every Student Should Study

by Max Andrews

Philosophy majors and minors alike, if they hope to receive a well-rounded look at the diverse perspectives out there, need to look beyond the more familiar “Western” ideologies. Those hailing from the “Eastern” world have held just as much of a global impact over religion, politics, art, science, and more, making them well worth academic inquiry. Far, far more than eight names left their mark on the philosophy and culture of Asia, of course, but anyone just launching their studies might find the following a reasonable start.

  1. Lao Tzu

    The founder of Taoism outlined all the tenets of his globally beloved philosophy in the Tao Te Ching sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries B.C. — and some even debate whether or not he was a real or apocryphal individual. In his most influential (to put it mildly) work, he touts the concept of the Tao, an invisible structure which drives all things, and believes enlightenment comes from attaining oneness with the surrounding universe. Harmony with nature as opposed to working against its will forms the crux of this religious and philosophical approach, making it ideal for anyone hoping to reduce stresses in their lives.

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May 17th, 2012

Sententias Products

by Max Andrews

The Sententias Store, Academic Alley, is full swing.  Please continue to check out the book of the week and my highly recommended books in the right margin.  Also, make sure you visit and get some Sententias apparel. You can see one of the multiverse t-shirts below purchased by Sean, a follower of the blog. If you have any recommendations for more products please let me know. Enjoy!

May 17th, 2012

An Exception to the BVG Theorem

by Max Andrews

The Borde-Vilenkin-Guth Theorem states that any universe, which has, on average, a rate of expansion greater 1 that system had to have a finite beginning. This would apply in any multiverse scenario as well.  There are four exceptions to the theorem.*

First Exception: Initial Contraction (Havg<0) … (The average rate of the Hubble expansion is less than zero)

An example of this would be found in de Sitter cosmology. In mathematics and physics, a de Sitter space is similar to Minkoswkian spacetime.  It is maximally symmetric and has constant positive curvature. Assume that a spatially infinite universe contracted down to a singularity and then bounced into our present expansion.  In such a case, the universe cannot be said to be, on average, in a state of cosmic expansion through its history since the expansion phase, even if infinite, is canceled out by the contraction phase.  Though this is permissible under the BVG it is not a viable or popular option.

George Ellis, one of the world’s leading cosmologists, has two objections:

May 17th, 2012

Theology Thursday: Alister McGrath

by Max Andrews

Theologian: Alister McGrath (1953 – present)

More about his theology:  McGrath is considered one of the leading developers and proponents of scientific theology. There is a long tradition within Christian theology of drawing on intellectual resources outside the Christian tradition as a means of developing a theological vision.  This approach is often referred to by the Latin phrase ancilla theologiae (a ‘handmaid of theology’).  The evolution of thought and method from Newton to Einstein vitalized scientific theology.  Scientific theology argues that the working methods and assumptions of the natural sciences represent the best—or the natural—dialogue partner for Christian theology.[1]