Archive for May 11th, 2012

May 11th, 2012

The Best Times to Schedule Blog Posts

by Max Andrews

When you share blog posts (or links in general) on Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr may determine how many views you get.  Some stats ran by Bitly helped to determine when links posted to these platforms got the most clicks.  You can read a full story at The Weekly Hustle.

May 11th, 2012

An Outline of the Historical Searches for Jesus

by Max Andrews

The First Search for the Historical Jesus (1778-1906)

  • Distinction between Christ of faith and Jesus of History
  • Accepted Gospel stories in general but rationalized or rejected miracle stories and claims to divinity
  • Jesus as moral example
  • Source criticism; Two document theory
  • Ends with claim we can know nothing of historical Jesus

The Period of No Quest for the Historical Jesus (1906-1953)

  • Nothing can be known of historical Jesus and not ultimately important; Living Christ of Faith is what matters
  • Form Criticism
  • Mark Displaced
  • Bultmann: Need to demythologize Gospels and get to kerygma; Authentic existence
    read more »

May 11th, 2012

The Big Crunch and the Bible

by Max Andrews

The universe was created 13.73 billion years ago.  At about 10-44 seconds after the big bang inflation kicked in and underwent a period of rapid inflation (expansion, this inflation force is thought to be dark energy depicted in Einstein’s lambda term (the cosmological constant) in the right hand side of his field equation describing the energy momentum of the universe.) The cosmological constant is a characteristic of the spacetime fabric of the universe related to its stretching energy (space energy density—commonly referred to as dark energy).  The more the universe expends, the greater this stretching energy becomes.[1]  When the spacetime fabric stretches, the bodies of masses, such as galaxies, move farther apart by the stretching of space.  The cosmological constant is in effect a pulling property that works against gravity.  Since creation, the cosmological constant’s effect has been increasing.  Initial expectations were for the expansion to slow down and for the universe to collapse back in on itself.  For instance, when a ball is tossed in the air its speed slows down and the ball falls to the ground.