Archive for May 6th, 2012

May 6th, 2012

What Happens When Particles Collide?

by Max Andrews

Richard Feynmann, a Nobel Laureate, developed thse diagrams to depict what happens when particles collide with each other.  I’ve made a rough diagram with an step by step explanation.

  1. The first incoming particle is a down quark, a building block of the proton. By convention, it is depicted by the straight line.
  2. The down quark emits a gluon and turns into a ‘virtual’ down quark. Virtual particles are intermediate stages that cannot be observed on their own.
  3. The other incoming particle is an up antiquark. This motion/arrow is moving backwards for reasons having to do with relativity theory.
  4. The up antiquark and virtual down quark annihilate each other, leaving behind a W boson.
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May 6th, 2012

Applying Philosophy to Romance

by Max Andrews

When you say “I love you” to your boyfriend or girlfriend, fiancé[e], or spouse the profundity behind that declaration is incredible.  So, if my beautiful wife asks, “Why do you love me?” what do I say?  Well, I give her my reasons of course… but at what point do I originate my reasons?  Yes, God has orchestrated the world that it be this way but what factors are involved in God’s providential molding?

I believe the question of love ultimately comes down to the individual’s agency, their free desire and choice to love.  If all my reasons to love are external then that would seem to imply that there could be external reasons for me to stop loving.  Here’s a few examples. I love my wife because:

  • She has a beautiful smile.
  • She is fun.
  • She is intelligent
  • She has gorgeous eyes.
  • Her personality complements mine.
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May 6th, 2012

Why You Shouldn’t Argue from Quantum Mechanics for Libertarian Freedom

by Max Andrews

One of the most important premises behind quantum physics is to understand its indeterminacy.  My question is whether or not a theist can use this as an argument for libertarianism.  Subatomic particles behave in indeterminate ways (i.e. if you know the location of a particle you do not know it’s velocity and vise versa).  It should be noted that this doesn’t negate the laws of causality.  Without the laws of causality science absolutely breaks down.  It’s really an issue of probability with quantum physics.  The case a libertarian may make is that because quantum mechanics function in an indeterminate way, only with a probability, then nothing can be determined, everything is random.  Atheist Daniel Dennett and agnostic Stephen Hawking hold to this view of soft-libertarianism (as naturalists).