Archive for April 13th, 2012

April 13th, 2012

Philosophy is Not a Science

by Max Andrews

Original story by Julian Friedland.

The intellectual culture of scientism clouds alternative ways of knowing that can actually yield greater certainty than science.

For roughly 98 percent of the last 2,500 years of Western intellectual history, philosophy was considered the mother of all knowledge. It generated most of the fields of research still with us today. This is why we continue to call our highest degrees Ph.D.’s, namely, philosophy doctorates. At the same time, we live an age in which many seem no longer sure what philosophy is or is good for anymore. Most seem to see it as a highly abstracted discipline with little if any bearing on objective reality — something more akin to art, literature or religion. All have plenty to say about reality. But the overarching assumption is that none of it actually qualifies as knowledge until proven scientifically.

Yet philosophy differs in a fundamental way from art, literature or religion, as its etymological meaning is “the love of wisdom,” which implies a significant degree of objective knowledge. And this knowledge must be attained on its own terms. Or else it would be but another branch of science.

April 13th, 2012

Why Didn’t God Just Create Heaven First?

by Max Andrews

This is a legitimate question. The claim that God could have created us in the state of heaven avoiding all this evil and suffering in the world is a nuanced version of the problem of evil.  If we are going to heaven and our telos, our purpose and end, is to worship God and enjoy him forever in heaven then why didn’t God skip this earthly step?  Surely, one may think that there’s a possible world in which we all exist in heaven.  It’s my contention that the instantiation of heaven alone is not a possible world.

Aside from other theodicies and defenses such as soul-making, perhaps the most relevant to this question, I think it’s critical to understand that heaven isn’t some lone possible state of affairs by itself.  Heaven is, necessarily, a contingent state of affairs.  It’s a consequent, if and only if, there are prior antecedent conditions or states of affairs.  Heaven is a result of our choices during this life.  In other words, this earthly life is a necessary condition for heaven to be brought about (aside from the salvific will of the Father and saving power of Christ, I’m merely stating that this life must precede heaven.

This also leads to a very important question: How does God guarantee that there will be no evil among the saved in heaven?  This is a very tough question and here are a few possible answers to consider.

April 13th, 2012

Immanuel Kant and the Human Moral Situation Part 2

by Max Andrews

For a greater context of discussion please see Part 1.

Concerning the human moral situation, there is a radical evil in us that tends toward evil and is linked to our actual will.  There is good implanted in every man fighting an “invisible foe who screens himself behind reason.”  Humans freely sin and are personally responsible to the God postulated and known to be true in the moral act.  Our sin goes against the categorical imperative of the mind.

Humans ought to be perfectible and ultimately can be perfected, this is living in the cat-imp Which every is obligated to keep.  Religion in Christianity gives a moral lawgiver whose will ought to be man’s final goal and end which is the ultimate goal for morality, “that which alone can render a world the object of a divine decree and the end of creation.”